WHO WON? (Quick Poll)

Last night was an important deadline for many. Blood, sweat and tears, brought many close--and some to success. How did you fair?

The Light Grows Shorter

E. L. Doctorow said, "Writing a novel is like driving a car at night. You can only see as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way." and it is to this doctrine I subscribe however, I find the beam is weakening as I approach the NaNoWriMo deadline. I have …

Continue reading The Light Grows Shorter

The Epic Struggle

“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.” —George Orwell

Plot Holes Take the Bite Out of Your Story!

Disjointed Jottings by Robert Smith (A.K.A. TyCobbsTeeth)

Tweet, Tweet — Twiddle, Twiddle, here comes another plot with a hole in the middle.

If you fail to explain how A connects to B, or state something that doesn’t make sense (without explanation), then you have left a plot hole.

You want your readers to get swept away in your story and be completely immersed. A plot hole can destroy that experience. If the reader drops out of the ride, in order to examine something that doesn’t make sense, you’ve lost them.

You may be too close to the story to see the holes. As you read through it, those gaps may be appear bridged, since the story did come from your head. The answers to those questions are in your noggin, so it doesn’t seem off. Have someone else read through your book, to make sure you didn’t leave any plot holes.

Remember, the reader badly wants to…

View original post 14 more words

3 Keys for Learning to Write

I think we can simplify this even further and say there are 2 keys to learning to write (or improving your writing).
1. Spend more time writing.
2. Obtain feedback.
Without a doubt, writing improves writing and the more you do it, the better you will become. Editing your own work is a crucial ingredient in this recipe, but help from editors and beta readers can certainly enhance the process.

Disjointed Jottings by Robert Smith (A.K.A. TyCobbsTeeth)

1. Spend more time writing: (Practice makes perfect)

It makes sense right –you will not become great at a sport unless you practice that sport–a lot. There is strong evidence that this is true for writing too. Five studies of exceptional literacy teachers found that great teachers ask their students to write frequently. In nine separate experiments with students, 15 additional minutes of writing time a day in grades two through eight produced better writing. Seventy-eight percent of studies testing the impact of extra writing found that student’s writing quality improved.

Not only did writing quality improve, so did reading comprehension.

2. Write on a computer: (Instant feedback)

In 83 percent of 30 studies on the use of word processing software, students’ writing quality improved when they wrote their papers on a computer instead of writing by hand. The impact was largest for middle school students…

View original post 89 more words

WE DON’T HAVE A CHOICE –They did.

As war and armed conflict rage around the globe, we who live in relatively peaceful countries, have a lot to remember --and a lot to be thankful for. Between November 9 and November 11, thoughts of the many brave and selfless souls, who have given life and limb for our freedom, will grace our consciousness, and at eleven …

Continue reading WE DON’T HAVE A CHOICE –They did.

Progress Feels Good

Day One of NaNoWriMo is almost behind us. October's apprehension, anxiousness, and anticipation all crashed into each other at the 11:59 starting-line --and waited. Halloween was a good distraction --it may be my favorite day of the year, but this year was different, I almost couldn't wait to get it behind me. You see --this is my first NaNoWriMo --this is …

Continue reading Progress Feels Good

The NaMos are Coming! The NaMos are Coming!

Could not be more amped up for November 1st!

The WordPress.com Blog

November is one week away, and that means NaNoWriMo and NaBloPoMo are, too!

If you’ve been thinking about reinvigorating your blogging or are finally ready to stop procrastinating on that book you’ve always wanted to write, these two great events (and communities) can give you the jolt of motivation you need.

NaMo what now?

NaNoWriMo and NaBloPoMo are short for “National Novel Writing Month” and “National Blog Posting Month,” respectively. In the first, writers commit to writing a 50,000-word novel between November 1 and November 30; in the second, to posting every single day in November.

310,095 participants started the month of November as auto mechanics, out-of-work actors, and middle school English teachers. They walked away novelists.

NaNoWriMo 2013 at a Glance

Although the two events are separate, they share a history: NaBloPoMo started in response to NaNoWriMo, when a group of bloggers who lacked the time or inclination to write…

View original post 452 more words

Ty Cobb’s Teeth

The base paths belonged to me, the runner. The rules gave me the right. I always went into a bag full speed, feet first. I had sharp spikes on my shoes. If the baseman stood where he had no business to be and got hurt, that was his fault. Ty Cobb   If it's something …

Continue reading Ty Cobb’s Teeth