Book Review — Inferno by Dan Brown

Inferno (Robert Langdon, #4) by Dan Brown Robert Smith (TyCobbsTeeth)'s review March 14, 2017 bookshelves: owned-paperbacks Inferno sets up fast. The story starts from several directions. Characters are brought along nicely, developing as the story lines converge. Like most of the books in this series, I find I learned a lot about the location and …

Continue reading Book Review — Inferno by Dan Brown

Advertisements
Punchy Book Reviews

Punchy Book Reviews

I like to read concise book reviews that are specific and don't contain spoilers. Answer a few questions for me and be done. What did you like about the book; did you dislike anything? Be balanced. No book is all good or all bad. Tell me about the writing, the storyline, and characters. Were the …

Continue reading Punchy Book Reviews

Book Review — Velocity by Dean Koontz

Velocity by Dean Koontz (Goodreads Author) Robert Smith (TyCobbsTeeth)'s review Oct 18, 2016  bookshelves: owned-paperbacks Read from August 07, 2015 to October 09, 2016   I started this work by Dean Koontz quite a while back, then set it aside. I had several other books on the go at the time, and this offering by …

Continue reading Book Review — Velocity by Dean Koontz

6 Ways To Get More Book Reviews

Book reviews are a form of social proof… via http://bookmarketingtools.com When a reader is deciding whether or not to buy a book, one of the things they look at is the reviews. A lack of reviews can cause potential readers to move onto another book. It’s obvious how important reviews are, but it can be …

Continue reading 6 Ways To Get More Book Reviews

National Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month Kid Lit Review of “Baseball Saved Us” by Ken Mochizuki

Fantastic story –reviewed by, Rhapsody in Books Weblog

Rhapsody in Books Weblog

Throughout American history, some citizens have had more rights and privileges than others.

When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, fear and prejudice towards the Japanese reached a fever pitch. These attitudes extended to both citizens and non-citizens of Japanese descent living in the United States.

In 1942 Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. Under the terms of the Order, approximately 110,000 people of Japanese descent living in the US were removed from their homes and placed in internment camps. The US justified its’ action by claiming that there was a danger of those of Japanese descent spying for the Japanese. However more than two thirds of those interned were American citizens and half of them were children. None had ever shown evidence of disloyalty.

Screen Shot 2013-07-19 at 5.24.11 AM

The internees were transported to one of ten relocation centers in California, Utah, Arkansas, Arizona, Idaho, Colorado, and Wyoming for up to 4…

View original post 605 more words